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Winter and spring writing prompts

Middle school students can work on their narrative writing skills as well as imagery when they try these winter themed writing prompts. Before students start writing, teachers may need to review the components of narrative stories and the literary element of imagery.

Winter and spring writing prompts

Writing a Narrative

Narrative stories can be fun to write. These stories should not be long, no more than one-to-three pages.

A narrative tells a story. It should have a beginning, middle and end. There should be some type of conflict that the main character or another character overcomes. The ending should have a resolution where all of the loose ends are tied up and there is closure for the characters.

Teaching Imagery

One literary element that adds to any story is imagery. Imagery is when the author uses details and sensory words to create pictures or images in a reader’s mind.

One way student writers can do this is to include the five senses: sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell. The writer should use words or phrases to encourage the reader to think about certain images that are associated with the senses.

For example the phrase, my fingers tingled and burned after I had a snowball fight with my brother is one phrase that can invoke an image in most reader’s minds. Readers who have played in the snow can think back to a time when they played too long in the snow and their fingers tingled. This memory will create an image in their mind, and it can be melded with the story.

Winter Writing Prompts

Once students have reviewed the components of a narrative story and the literary element of imagery, the teacher can ask the students to choose one of the writing prompts. These writing prompts each have a digital photo included to help students create imagery in their narrative stories.

Writing Prompt #1: Students need to look at the photo number one that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: The trees bent and swayed from heavy snow and wind. Then our electricity went out.

Writing Prompt #2: Students need to look at the photo number two that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: The path in the trees was going to be difficult to find, but I just had to go and find my glasses.

Winter writing prompts

Writing Prompt #3: Students need to look the at photo number three that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: We had been walking for hours. The shack looked creepy, but at least we would be out of the snow.

Writing Prompt #4: Students need to look at the photo number four that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: I sat on my sled and looked down the hill. I hope I don’t hit the trees.

After students have chosen their writing prompt, they need to write a draft of their stories. Students can share their stories with the class after they complete them.

Spring Writing Prompts

By focusing on spring themed writing prompts, middle school students can work on their narrative writing skills as well as their use of description. Teachers may need to review the components of narrative stories and the literary element of imagery before beginning the writing process.

Write a Narrative

These narrative pieces should not be long, no more than one-to-three pages. And, the writing process should invoke the students’ creativity.

A written narrative will tell a story and have a beginning, middle and end. It should also showcase some type of conflict that the main character or another character overcomes. The ending should tied up all the loose ends and have a closure for the characters.

Review Imagery

Imagery is a literary element that can add quite a bit of flare to a student’s story. When an author uses details and sensory words to create pictures or images in a reader’s mind, the author is using imagery.

The writer should include the five senses: sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell to help improve the use of imagery. In addition, the writer should use words or phrases to encourage the reader to think about certain images that are associated with the senses.

spring writing prompts

For example, the sun’s rays warmed the back of my neck as I watched the robin hop away is one phrase that can invoke an image in most reader’s minds. Many readers have enjoyed the appearance of a robin in the spring as well as the return of the warm weather. The memory can help add to the imagery of the story about spring.

Spring Writing Prompts

After teachers have reviewed the elements of a narrative story and imagery, they need to ask the students to choose one of the writing prompts to start a narrative story. A digital photo is included for each writing prompt to aid students in writing the stories and to help in including imagery.

Writing Prompt #1: Students need to look at the photo number one that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: Finally, the little bush’s leaves were starting to appear; it had been a very long winter.

Writing Prompt #2: Students need to look at the photo number two that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: The deer seemed to appear at once on the sun-lit gravel road, making me wonder who else was out here.

Writing Prompt #3: Students need to look the at photo number three that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: I looked at the trees that were just starting to bud and wondered where in the world my brother had wandered off to this time.

Writing Prompt #4: Students need to look at the photo number four that is included with the lesson. Then, they need to start the narrative story with the following: My mother was going to be angry. Something was eating her favorite flowers.

When students choose a writing prompt that interests them, they need to write the rest of the story. The story should be complete and creative. Students should share their stories and talk about how they used imagery and how they created the stories.

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